hometta.

According to its Web site, “Hometta is a collaborative of designers, architects, builders, writers and editors who have banded together to rethink and improve the way residential architecture is designed today. Founder Mark Johnson and partner Andrew McFarland joined forces with four core architects and designers, whose vision has guided Hometta’s development. They, in turn, have helped recruit the 31 studios who have contributed home plans to Hometta’s first stage of life.”

Hometta is as a place where mass-produced homes meet green/sustainable building materials, resulting in beautiful, modern domeciles. While mass-produced housing may make some people cringe (or conjure visions of a double-wide trailer screaming down the highway towing a vinyl-sided rancher on its flatbed), I tend to believe that your chances of the neighbor duplicating your house are slim. Mainly because, in the US at least, uber modern sustainable construction is not overpopulating the landscape in the same veign as its twice-removed two-story colonial spec-house  cousin. In fact, you would probably have a greater chance of living next door to this, than say the Rubix House.

Last night I took a look through the floor plans (to get a full view you have to become a paying member — which if you’re truly serious about taking the home building plunge isn’t badly priced), and here are some designs that I thought were fun:



Dogtrot Casita
by KRDB.



Shot-trot

by Brett Zamore Design.

48′ House by Interloop–Architecture.

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One response to “hometta.

  1. Pingback: hometta. at thegraffik | Design and Illustration

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