Category Archives: home goods

ICFF 2010 Favorite: Studio Dunn.

 We almost missed Studio Dunn entirely! We started out the afternoon on the opposite end of the show space and by the 5:00 p.m. closing time we were only half way through. Thankfully, we sped up and rushed through the second-half of the exhibits, where we happened upon Studio Dunn.

The New England-based studio was founded by Asher Dunn (a graduate of RISD) and an offshoot of Keeseh Studio, which is a Rhode Island-based commuity woodworking studio. Studio Dunn strives to be environmentally concious by minimizing waste and using solid American hardwoods sourced from sustainable forests. We were immediately struck by the craftmanship that goes into each piece. The shapes are mindful of midcentury Dutch design but ultimately evoke a decidely modern appeal — something we saw across the board at this year’s ICFF.  If accolades are any indication as to a design studio’s industry appeal, Studio Dunn’s trajectory looks promising — this year it won the ICFF Editors Award for Best New Designer.

ICFF 2010 Favorite: Deborah Bowness wallpaper.

   

Deborah Bowness’s Trompe l’oeil-esque hand printed wallpaper hit our chic spot. The petite Brit has been designing wallpaper for seven years. Ms. Bowness starts with a digital image,  then screen prints or digitally prints her designs, which are offered in drops or in kits — individual pieces that can be arranged to create a unique scenes on your wall. Her images evoke a modern sensibility, influenced by mid-century aesthetics. Her collections include, “Frocks” — a collage of dresses; “Utility” — selections of chairs, lamps, books, and drawers; “Flora & Fauna” — flowers, etc.; “Books” — stacks and stacks of books; and “Illusions of Grandeur” — distorted and faded patterns. We chatted briefly with designer, who informed us that she’s soon launching her Web shop, which will very much imitate her workspace. We can’t wait!!

ICFF: Saturday at the Javits.

After the art installation, we were off to take in ICFF 2010 at the Javits Center. We milled about for three hours, chatting with designers, vendors, and oogling over all of the amazing pieces, it was a blast. I’ve included some photos below of my favorite sights so that you can see what we liked, but I’ll be writing more about these later.

Molo‘s Booth, which won the Booth Award for the 2010 ICFF EDITORS AWARDS







@ICFF 2010!

ICFF 2010 here we come! We’ll be reporting back (and hopefully tweeting throughout) with all of the exciting new objects and designs that stop us in our tracks at this year’s furniture fair. Stay tuned!

certamente salad tools.

Certamente salad servers
Living among and interacting with beautifully designed objects on a daily basis truly shapes your environment. If money is no object, you can go about incorporating beautiful things into your life at your convenience. For those of us who need to be more selective, starting small — with tools you use regularly — is a great way to start transforming your world. These Certamente salad tools by Serafino Zani (designed by Konstantin Grcic) embody my sentiments on how ordinary objects can make even the mundane beautiful and exciting. Serving a salad with these gorgeous implements might cause mixed-green medleys to materialize at your table morning, noon, and night.

Available at Wannekes.

schubladen furniture.

schubLaden (German for drawers) is a furniture company based out of Berlin. The designers take cast-aside drawers and create new furniture with them. The result is a perfect mixed of contemporary and vintage, creating a unique and one-off piece of furniture. schubLaden will also create custom-made pieces at your request. Here are some of my favorite pieces:


piece 40|02

 
piece 44|02

 
piece 41|05

 
piece 41|01

brent comber.

I love the the idea of offsetting modern interiors with natural elements, and Brent Comber‘s stunning wooden objects would look right at home in a sitting room outfitted with acrylic Louis Ghost chairs. In my mind’s eye, the result is an unusual, yet balanced juxtaposition of organic vs. manmade. The Vancouver-based designer started working with natural elements when he ran his landscaping business and through a search to restore his prewar-era home using older wood he found a passion for the organic material and ran with it. In addition to his gorgeous objects, Comber also designs interior spaces and sculptures. Here are a few of his pieces that I’m smitten with . . .

 Brentcomber_shattered

Shattered (made of Douglas Fir with a natural finish)

Brentcomber_alder cubes
Alder Cubes (made of Alder with a clear finish)